redbeardace:

I took my thermal camera to Yellowstone, because I’m just that much of a nerd.

1: Old Faithful

2: Mammoth Terraces

3: Orange Spring Mound

4: Boardwalk by Grand Prismatic Spring

5: Firehole River at Midway Geyser Basin.  The left side of the river is notably warmer than the right because of the Excelsior Geyser outflow just upstream.

6: Fumaroles

7: Hot Pool Runoff Channels

8: Clouds

9: Heat traces underneath the Firehole Lake parking lot.  It was a cold, overcast day.  A parking lot surface should not have been 40C.  This points to something interesting going on under the surface.  (It should be noted that this is not the section of Firehole Lake Drive that melted earlier this year…)

10: Temperature gradient at Whirligig Geyser in Norris Geyser Basin.  Here, the runoff from two pools joins into a single stream.  The green thermophile likes the cooler water on the left side, while the right side is hotter.

(via thisisarocktumbler)

discoverynews:

Dolphins Can Sense Magnets
Dolphins can now add magnetic sense to their already impressive resume of abilities, new research suggests.
When researchers presented the brainy cetaceans with magnetized or unmagnetized objects, the dolphins swam more quickly toward the magnets, the new study found. The animals may use their magnetic sense to navigate based on the Earth’s magnetic field, the researchers said. Read more

discoverynews:

Dolphins Can Sense Magnets

Dolphins can now add magnetic sense to their already impressive resume of abilities, new research suggests.

When researchers presented the brainy cetaceans with magnetized or unmagnetized objects, the dolphins swam more quickly toward the magnets, the new study found. The animals may use their magnetic sense to navigate based on the Earth’s magnetic field, the researchers said. Read more

(via thisisarocktumbler)

cool-critters:

Moonrat (Echinosorex gymnura)

Moonrats inhabit most jungle terrain in southern Myanmar, Peninsular Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia, Borneo and Sumatra. Although they are closely related to the short-tailed gymnure and to the hedgehog, full grown specimens more closely resemble large rats, with which they share similar habits and ecological niches. Moonrats are nocturnal and terrestrial, lying up under logs, roots or in abandoned burrows during the day. They inhabit moist forests including mangrove and swamp forests and often enter water. They feed on earthworms and various small animals, mostly arthropods. Moonrats release strong odours with a strong ammonia content to mark the edges of their territories and warn other moonrats to stay away with threatening hisses also to ward off predators. Adults live alone.

photo credits: postersguide, Konstans Brunnenkarlshuker.blogspot.com

(via imthespeedofspook)

prozdvoices:

Anonymous said:

Would you please voice your favorite one of those NFL text gifs in the deepest, most booming voice you can?

This one is absolutely the best one.  I didn’t think doing a super deep booming voice would fit this one as well, though. 

Anyways, this is pretty much exactly how I reacted to Ouran High School Host Club too.

Read along with the original full gifset. (There are spoilers for Ouran High School Host Club)

Original post by invocative

humanoidhistory:

September 30, 1969: “A progress photograph of sample experiments being conducted in the Manned Spacecraft Center’s Lunar Receiving Laboratory with lunar material brought back to Earth by the crew of the Apollo 11 mission. Aseptic cultures of liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha) - a species of plant commonly found growing on rocks or in wooded areas - are shown in two rows of sample containers. Seven weeks or some 50 days prior to this photograph 0.22 grams of finely ground lunar material was added to each of the upper samples of cultures. The lower cultures were untreated, and a noted difference can be seen in the upper row and the lower one, both in color and size of the cultures.”
(NASA)

humanoidhistory:

September 30, 1969: “A progress photograph of sample experiments being conducted in the Manned Spacecraft Center’s Lunar Receiving Laboratory with lunar material brought back to Earth by the crew of the Apollo 11 mission. Aseptic cultures of liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha) - a species of plant commonly found growing on rocks or in wooded areas - are shown in two rows of sample containers. Seven weeks or some 50 days prior to this photograph 0.22 grams of finely ground lunar material was added to each of the upper samples of cultures. The lower cultures were untreated, and a noted difference can be seen in the upper row and the lower one, both in color and size of the cultures.”

(NASA)